Djibouti

Letter from Bankoulé

By / September 2016

Rachel Pieh Jones goes looking for a waterfall in the Djiboutian desert: “I tried to keep my expectations low. I know how little water there is in the desert, how unlikely it is to fall in substantial cascades.”

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Dreams of Djiboutian Olympic Glory

By / August 2016

Ayanleh Souleiman is Djibouti’s best hope for an Olympic medal in nearly thirty years. Rachel Pieh Jones interviewed him about his hopes for Rio.

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Tea Time at the TB Clinic

By / June 2016

When, asks writer Rachel Pieh Jones, is it rude for a foreigner to refuse a drink? “My way has always been to say yes, to fried camel hump, rancid butter, syrupy drinks. But am I still foreign? Does time erase the pressure to comply?”

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Women Are My Tribe

By / February 2016

Rachel Jones on the gender imbalance in Djibouti’s most popular sport: “The men are playing games while the women are working. To outsiders this can seem inherently sexist.”

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You Can’t Go Home Again

By / January 2016

Rachel Pieh Jones profiles a Yemeni American struggling to make a life in a new country: “It is so expensive here,” Ibrahim said. “I can’t work. My kids aren’t in school. We don’t speak French. We feel so much stress.”

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To Find a House, To Make a Home

By / December 2015

In Djibouti, writes Rachel Pieh Jones, the work of dilals, or house finders, is unheralded yet profound: “Home becomes our place of melding the old and new, familiar and foreign, into the shape of our own liking.”

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